The Ashes: Let’s Replace The DRS In Cricket

The Ashes are upon us, and so too are the eyes of controversy! In this pinnacle of cricketing contests between Australia and the old enemy, the role of the DRS (Digital Review System) has come squarely into focus. The DRS consists of different video technologies which aim to provide 100% accurate information that will either support or overturn an umpire’s decision. Predictably, 100% accuracy hasn’t been achieved. Here’s a cheeky look at five fantastic pieces of technology from the Fitness range at Harvey Norman that are guaranteed to work more accurately than the DRS!

 

HoMedics Health Station Scales HoMedics Health Station Scales

When reviewing a potential catch, the DRS turns to “Hot Spot”, an infra-red technology that’s meant to show if there was a heat spot on the bat where the supposed nick took place. Unfortunately, Hot Spot seems to break down every second delivery. The “Snickometer” — the sound measuring device — doesn’t seem to work any better. Luckily though, Harvey Norman has the solution – “Scalo”. Next time England’s Stuart Broad warily comes out to bat, Scalo will use weight measurements to determine if the ball has taken a sneaky glance off his bat on the way through to the slips cordon. The extraordinarily accurate HoMedics Health Station Scales will have been embedded into the batting crease so that anytime throughout the innings Broad hits the ball and claims he didn’t we’ll just take a look at Scalo. His weight’s increased from 90kg to 90.156kg? That is the exact weight of the ball! You’re out, Broad! Don’t try and fool us again!

 

Zeo Sleep Management System

One of the great Ashes characters in the ‘90s was English left-arm spinner, Phil Tufnell. He was known among his teammates as “The Cat” due to his fondness for sleeping in the dressing room. However, it seemed he was often asleep on the field as well, if his comical misfields were anything to go by! If only The Cat had the Zeo Sleep Management System. During the game we’d hook Tuffers up to the Zeo Sleep Management System, which analyses your sleep, showing how much REM and deep sleep you’re getting, as well as how long it takes you to drop off. With The Cat hooked up, the coach would have been alerted by smartphone as soon he started dozing off on that warm summer day on the boundary. A quick shout later and Tuffers would have been awake before REM kicked into a deep sleep – just in time to stop a glorious Tubby Taylor cover drive from going for four.

 

Garmin Approach G1 Golf Watch

When Aussie wickets start to fall at Lords, so too do the Australian TV ratings. While the TV networks can’t fix our batting woes, as much as they may try, they can halt any ratings loss if they had access to the nifty Garmin Approach G1 Golf Watch, With detailed real-time golf course data, including the distance to the green, fans would have been glued to the screen. So what if Watto’s been given out again on a tough LBW call? How’s he going on the second hole at the golf course down the road? Who cares if Clarkey’s been sent walking when he hasn’t even come close to nicking it? How’s he going with the sand bunkers? Not only wouldn’t we mind every time an Aussie wicket fell, we’d be actively cheering knowing that we’d be getting the stats from yet another player, with a bit of free time on his hands, headed to the fairway.

 

Mio Pace PC+ Activity Monitor

Mio Pacer PC+ Activity MonitorFan interactivity used to mean that you’d ring up and vote for Mark Waugh’s classic catch at Headingly in ’97, in the hopes of winning a bucket of chicken. Well, fan interactivity will now involve actively comparing fans and players throughout the game. Every now and then a member of the crowd will yell out that they’re working harder than some of the players. Therefore, we’ve decided to attach both players and fans to the wireless Mio Pace PC+ Activity Monitor, which accurately measures activity over the day. We’ll be able to truly see if a day’s worth of walking up to the bar to get a drink and a hot pie equates to more energy being spent than a day’s worth of activity on the field. Although we’re still not sure who the results are going to reflect badly upon!

 

Garmin eTrex 30 GPS

If Mike Gatting had the Garmin eTrex 30 GPS when he was batting at Old Trafford in ’93, he might have known where Warney’s ball of the century had come from. That’s all we’re saying!

 

Check out Harvey Norman’s full range of innovative fitness technologies, designed to help you improve your health and achieve your personal best. We’d love to hear what other piece of technology you think could be used during The Ashes.